Brown Rice Syrup Modeling Chocolate Cutouts

Making Modeling Chocolate with Brown Rice Syrup

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I recently experimented and made modeling chocolate with organic brown rice syrup.

Normally I make my modeling chocolate (candy clay) with organic light corn syrup but I haven’t been able to find any lately. Instead I bought some organic brown rice syrup and decided to give it a try.

I also made a small batch of modeling chocolate with my remaining organic corn syrup so I could compare and contrast.

First I’ll show you how I made modeling chocolate with organic brown rice syrup and then I’ll show you how it compares and contrasts with modeling chocolate made with corn syrup.

Do keep in mind that I made my modeling chocolate using Wilton candy melts. Results will vary depending on whether you use candy melts or dark, milk or white chocolate.

How to Make Modeling Chocolate with Brown Rice Syrup

SUPPLIES:

  • Candy melts (I used Wilton) or chocolate wafers
  • Organic Brown rice syrup
  • Double broiler or microwave
  • Heat-safe (or microwaveable) bowls
  • Wooden spoon
  • Plastic wrap
  • Vegetable shortening (optional)

The first thing you need to do is melt your candy melts either in the microwave or using a double broiler. Be sure to stir frequently as the chocolate will continue to melt while you stir.

Warm up your brown rice syrup and add when your candy is silky smooth.
Stir so that all of the chocolate comes into contact with the brown rice syrup but be careful not to overstir. 

Once your chocolate has seized and is thoroughly combined pour it out onto a piece of plastic cling wrap. Flatten, cover with the cling wrap and allow to cool completely (at least 1 hour, you can also leave it overnight).

Making Modeling Chocolate with Brown Rice Syrup

If you’re using colored candy melts don’t be alarmed if they become pale when melted. Once cool they will revert to the original color.

As you can see below there was a bit of unmixing while it cooled. That’s ok, most will get re-incorporated in the next step.

Break your candy into manageable pieces (I had to break my half batch into about 8-10 pieces) and knead until soft. Now you have brown rice syrup modeling chocolate.

Knead Into Modeling ChocolateSTORING MODELING CHOCOLATE :

For best results when not in use wrap your modeling chocolate in cling wrap, seal inside a ziplock bag and store in a sealed container. This will keep your modeling chocolate fresh and prevent it from drying out.

Storing Modeling chocolate candy clay

Modeling chocolate does become quite hard when it’s cool. When you want to work with it pull it out, cut into chunks and knead until soft. The heat of your hand helps make it workable.

Alternatively you could pop it into the microwave for a few seconds and then knead.

Candy clay Break apart and knead to soften

 

Modeling Chocolate with Brown Rice Syrup
 
No corn syrup? No problem. Make your modeling chocolate (candy clay) with delicious organic brown rice syrup.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 12 oz candy melts (340 g)
  • 3 oz organic brown rice syrup (85 g) (4 tablespoons)
Instructions
Melt the candy wafers
  1. StoveTop Instructions: Melt the candy wafers in a glass or metal bowl over a pot of boiling water. (Be careful not to get any water or moisture into the chocolate). Stir until all the wafers are melted and then remove from the heat.
  2. Microwave Instructions: Heat the candy melts in 30 second intervals stirring in between. Be careful not to overheat. The wafers will continue to melt as you stir.
Combine
  1. Warm the brown rice syrup (either in the microwave or immerse a sealed tupperware container containing the syrup in a warm water bath, but carefully dry the outside of the container afterward) and add the warmed brown rice syrup to the melted candy wafers.
  2. Stir gently so that all of the chocolate comes in contact with the brown rice syrup but don't over-mix.
Rest then Knead
  1. Pour the mixture out onto a sheet of plastic wrap, flatten and wrap with the plastic.
  2. After the mixture has cooled (at least 1 hour, or you could also leave overnight) gently knead the mixture into a workable consistency. Re-wrap and store or use right away.

 

Comparison: Corn Syrup Modeling Chocolate vs Brown Rice Syrup Modeling Chocolate

For comparison I made three half batches (using 6oz of candy melts and 1.5oz of brown rice syrup) of modeling chocolate: 1) Wilton Dark Green vanilla candy melts with organic light corn syrup, 2) Wilton Dark Green vanilla candy melts with organic brown rice syrup, and 3) Wilton Dark Green + Bright White vanilla candy melts with organic brown rice syrup.

COLOR:

The color difference between the corn syrup modeling chocolate and the brown rice syrup modeling chocolate is almost negligible. In the picture below you can see that the corn syrup mixture is ever so slightly more intense.

Candy clay corn syrup vs brown rice syrup

But, it should be noted that the organic light corn syrup I used is a pale brown just like the organic brown rice syrup. If you’re used to using clear corn syrup then the color difference may be greater.

TASTE:
Modeling chocolate made using corn syrup and vanilla candy melts has a sweet vanilla-y flavor. But when you use vanilla candy melts and brown rice syrup the flavor is more like toffee.

I did a blind taste test with my family and the results were 50/50. Hubby prefers the corn syrup modeling chocolate. He said it was less sweet and milder tasting. My daughter, as per usual when faced with an either/or choice, chose ‘both’. Personally I prefer the brown rice syrup modeling chocolate. The flavor is intoxicating and I could just keep shoveling it into my mouth instead of working with it.

So really taste-wise it’s a personal preference but you also might want to consider your cake and buttercream recipe to determine which flavor would work better.

STRUCTURE:

The two types of modeling chocolate behaved fairly similarily although the brown rice syrup modeling chocolate is a little bit drier and slightly more firm than the corn syrup modeling chocolate.

I rolled out two batches of modeling chocolate (light green = brown rice, dark green = corn syrup) to the same thickness, cut them with a circle cutter and left them for 15 minutes to cool down and firm up.

Then I placed them on top of a mason jar too see how far they would extend before the structure failed.

Modeling Chocolate Strength Test

At the mid-point they are both holding strong. At about 2/3 – 3/4 they both started to bend but the corn syrup modeling chocolate bent more quickly.

Next I tried making modeling chocolate roses. The brown rice syrup modeling chocolate is little bit drier. As you can see the edges of the rose petals are cracking and the whole flower looks a little less fluid.

Modeling Chocolate Roses corn syrup vs brown rice syrup

So I experimented and kneaded a small amount of Crisco vegetable shortening into the brown rice syrup modeling chocolate. This made a difference to the overall workability and resulted in a prettier, more organic looking rose.

Brown Rice Syrup Candy Clay roses shortening

If you compare the corn syrup modeling chocolate rose with the brown rice syrup  modeling chocolate rose with added shortening they are similar.

candy clay rosesCONCLUSION:

If you don’t have access to corn syrup or prefer a more toffee-like taste to your modeling chocolate then brown rice syrup is a great alternative.

If you’re making cutouts you can use the modeling chocolate with brown rice syrup as you would traditional modeling chocolate. But if you’re wanting to do more delicate work such as flower petals or leaves then you will want to add some vegetable shortening to make the modeling chocolate less dry and more workable.

Have you tried making modeling chocolate with brown rice syrup? How did it go? Let me know in the comments below. 

 

Making Modeling Chocolate with Organic Brown Rice Syrup
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2 Responses to Making Modeling Chocolate with Brown Rice Syrup

  1. Ritu July 2, 2017 at 7:26 pm #

    Making this recipe right now! Hope it turns out. Can you refrigerate leftover modelling chocolate?

    • Tara July 2, 2017 at 10:00 pm #

      I wouldn’t recommend refrigerating the leftovers as it will make it very hard to work with. Already at room temperature you need to knead the pieces to be able to work with them.

      Because of the sugar content leftovers that are wrapped and stored in an air tight container will keep for several months.

      On a side note, if the modeling chocolate becomes too soft while you’re working with it you can absolutely put it in the fridge for a few minutes to firm up.

      Hope this helps 🙂

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